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Sat at a family function last weekend my cousin on my mom's side made a great comment about how 'cool' it was to 'still have something out there that defines who you are creatively'. Starting the website as I did in 2006 seen all and most of the curves of online life and yet still check in on my figures of sales each month and particularly which companies and by which countries people still find me.

 

I suppose it's possible that you can, in fact, find people by accident on a website so if your landing page is in any way decent you may be inclined to be inquisitive. 

 

Streams via relevant online companies

 

With a number of tracks already written that will need to be recorded within the next year always excited to see that people from the United States, UK, Europe and as far as New Zealand find time to listen to the 20 years of varying recordings that are available out there.

 

When asked 'how' the music is going, generally now just reply by the facts of the figures that I see. Most money in the industry is derived via live shows so if you even have one song that people may have heard of making monthly pennies and not out there touring regardless of age it has to be a good thing. My point being it reaches a placement of having a life of its own. UMA by example have their own parent company in Russia, and with Youtube also now doing music streams always encouraging that people are using your latest release for something of their own by way of making videos. The pro's out there will state its best to keep the public informed so let us surmise that I did. [I Doubt It], was a song written and never recorded prior to 2019 and now being used in that format. I gave up looking at or more importantly caring about views and likes a long time ago, and after living in the village and walking the lanes of Earlswood and Tanworth for 7 years taking a lot of pictures of daily life, understand what I determined as the 'Nick Drake' theory. 

 

You can play London for example however once out of the big city still at all points holden to the realities of where you live. It's odd I suppose that in a lifetime or at any time after that things still trickle in.

 

The objectivity of the process is not getting caught up in why you make sales, or at one point had a few thousand followers, followed by artists and actors who are all better known, got likes, or had a few thousand views on a page. The relevance is that once created if you've ever been out there doing it by way of playing live then it's real.

 

It's not how I imagined it to be!

 

Online streams are relevant to the facts that If one person in New Zealand is listening to a song that you wrote based on anything it's a win-win moving forward. Millions of people play the guitar with most I would suggest playing other people's songs and once you've moved beyond the days of only family and friends there are so many factors in play that its generally a good idea not to overthink things. I have my instruments or tools of the trade and at points now where I do feel like it's worth releasing music still do it - I don't expect a massive response. The difference is when I started out, I did. That really is my only standard answer.

 

Do you tweet a thing? What is it you want out of the process? Do you write a blog? What is it you need from the message. 

 

 

You could sit there all debating who is and isn't popular and why and then still look at the power of a stream. It doesn't take away from the ability of the songbook or at any times you do play live the abilities to deliver it. Its been a pretty decent summer here and with the darker nights drawing in, not enough these days to want to be a rock star. 

 

This website is the first port of call for me. The facts that remain every month you can also produce at least some tangible reality to why you grew up dreaming is the only great reason you did. I'm not a session player or band member and have never at any point wanted to start a cover group (all musicians).

 

 

I write songs and produce things. 

 

Best wishes.

 

Michael David Curley

 

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